What I'm Reading These Days 

(I tend to read several things at once.)

A hodgepodge of books I'm currently reading (if I remember to add them) ... My intention is to tell you a little about them.  Some are for fun, others for personal growth, business, etc.  I'll only include ones I think are worth recommending.  I would love to hear your comments if you read any books I've recommended. (For your convenience, most of the book covers link to Amazon.)

 

(January 15 -- I'm still trying to catch up and get this current.  Keep checking back for additions.  A-KR)

Series of seven books, and trust me, you want the entire series.  This is just breathtaking.  Wonderfully profound insights into life and Scripture.  Believable and these books take you through the entire range of emotions.

October 2017

A prelude to The Prayer Box, but read Prayer Box first.  I don't think I would have enjoyed this one as much if I hadn't already read the other.  This gives a nice bit of back story.

 

Here's a tip when it comes to a series of books.  It's usually best to read them in the order written, not chronological order.  The back story will mean more if you read it in the order in which it came to the author's mind.

December 2017

One of my all-time favorites.  I've read this so many times since 1980 that I've lost count.  I had written so many notes in my first copy that I finally had to buy a second.  Now I have it on Kindle.  I'm doing something different, though, in that I'm going to read it throughout the year, really focusing on one spiritual discipline each month.  The goal of spiritual disciplines is to use them as tools to grow closer to God ... which is the whole point of life.

Throughout 2018

Another book that I've chosen to read throughout 2018, but on more of a daily basis.  Also by Richard Foster (who wrote Celebration of Discipline, above), this devotional focuses on the Scriptures and spiritual disciplines with the goal of a deeper intimacy with God.  I've got it on my Kindle as that will just make it a no-brainer to keep this and Celebration of Discipline at the top of my library where I'll see them each day and read them before I read anything else.

Throughout 2018

I rarely read outside Kindle, but I like to read Jesus Calling from my imitation leather copy because it feels good.  🙂  Mine is lavender, which I couldn't find to put here.  It's also available in many other paperback styles and on Kindle.  I probably won't read this one every day, as I'm focusing on spiritual disciplines this year, but I do find these readings to be comforting, insightful ... and often exactly what I need for the day.  If you've never read this before, I highly recommend as a daily devotional.

Throughout 2018

I read this for the first time what seems like a million years ago, but since we're on the topic of daily devotionals, I thought I'd mention it here.  It has continued to be one of my favorites, which I've come back to many times, and I'm sure I'll use it again.  These are for you if you want to truly live out your faith in a practical way.  You will not find wishy-washy platitudes here.  You will be led to a higher standard.  The challenge is to give your utmost for His highest glory.

Years ago

I wrote this years ago for my own children, then published it for other homeschoolers.  The idea is simple:  Read through the New Testament in a year, in order to get the overall picture.  There are New Testament reading assignments four days a week, followed by a simple question designed to keep you on task in your reading.  Application questions build good Bible reading habits.  Forty-Four weeks, so you can take off a month to focus on Passover and a month for Advent.  Use it individually, or it makes a great family devotional.  Last year, I used it with a Facebook group.

2017

Books about prayer are usually written by introverts.  This is something Jared Brock (who is definitely an extrovert) points out at the beginning of this delightful, hilarious, and profound journey around the world, exploring prayer.  Some of the things he does:

* Dances with Hasidic Jews in Brooklyn    * Discovers the 330-year-old home of Brother Lawrence    * Burns his clothes at the end of the Camino de Santiago   * Attends the world's largest church in Seoul    * Visits Westboro Baptist Church    * Tries to stay out of trouble in North Korea    * Meets the Pope and has lunch at the Vatican    * Attempts fire walking (with only minor burns)
Reading this jump-started my somewhat weary prayer life.  You will love it.

December 2017

Best book of this type. Dr Rawls does a phenomenal job of explaining how the body works and why/how certain things are good or bad for you.  You don't have to be sick to read this -- in fact, so much the better if you read it while you're doing great.  This book is helpful whether you just want to be healthier or if you're suffering from a chronic disease and want to find a solution.  I've also subscribed to Dr. Rawls' protocol for Lyme -- the supplements and emails. I can't thank him and his staff enough!!! I'm getting better!

A few times in the past 2 years.  (Dr Rawls is my hero.)

The word that keeps coming to mind when I think of this is "cheeky."  It's a fun read, but also passionately informative.  Not to mention that Lucie's writing style is wonderfully descriptive and amusing.  This is one of those books that you need to read because you don't want to do it yourself.

November 2017

I'm always looking for books with some similarity to mine.  I want to see if people who like reading my books might enjoy this one as well.  I love to recommend books to my readers.  Well, this one did not disappoint.  Full of wonderful wisdom.  I highlighted quite a bit of it to journal about.  Beautiful thoughts, lovingly written.  And yes, highly recommended.

October 2017

Okay, see, I don't use cookbooks, I read them.  I don't like to use recipes, but I like to get ideas, learn techniques ... and these days, hand it over to Bill to cook.  I like being married to a man who loves to take care of me!  And he's a pretty darn good cook, too.

October 2017

Because I'm absolutely stuck on Deborah Raney.  She has this way of coming up with situations that could happen ... that are impossible to find a really good solution to ... and making you struggle through them.  I guess I find these cathartic, because it's kind of what I've lived.

October 2017

Deboarah Raney has fast become one of my favorite authors.  I bought this book because it had a similar subject matter to one of mine and I was curious to see where she went with it.  I love the way that she doesn't sugar coat things.  She doesn't portray an ideal world.  The dilemmas in this book are difficult and hard to know what the "right" way is to handle them.  Another great book by the same author which I recommend even more:  Beneath a Southern Sky.  (You can see my review of this below.)

October 2017

Hilarious and well-written!  There were times when I was reading this in bed, with Bill asleep beside me, and I had to choke back laughter so as not to wake him.  This is a true story about a rather eccentric British family who moves to Corfu (an island off the coast of Greece) between the two world wars.  It was turned into a PBS masterpiece -- which I've now added to my Netflix DVD queue.

October 2017

I've read this book a couple times already and have enjoyed it each time.  It's interesting to read about his journey, but you'll also get some good insights about Scripture from learning about the land where it took place.  One to read again and again.  (There was also a TV series.)

September 2017

One of the things that I'm using as research for Summon Forth the Generations is David Barton's American Heritage DVD series.  This is giving me a lot of great information about the motivation for the American Revolution and the people involved in it.
If you love American history or want to learn more about it, you will hear quite a different perspective in this series than you heard in school.  One of the things Barton shows is how the emphasis and perspective of teaching history has changed ... and that has colored our perception of our history as Americans.  It has also strongly affected the culture and laws of our country.
If you're anxiously waiting for Summon Forth the Generations (the next book in the Isaiah Cadre Series), this DVD series will whet your appetite and give you a greater understanding of what Lambert Wilkes experienced.  It will make you yearn for our nation's greatness to be restored and it will send you to your knees.

September 2017

Wow!  Just finished and ... what a tear-jerker.  Completely believable story of a young woman who is widowed, remarries ... and then discovers that her husband didn't die after all.  Heart-wrenching, profound, wise, and thought-provoking in many regards.

September 2017

When I traveled through Europe 34 years ago, Tuscany became my favorite part of the world, so I read just about everything I can put my hands on which will remind me of its flavor.  Fun romance.

September 2017

Bees are just the motif, not what the story is about.  This is a beautifully written coming-of-age story set in the American South in 1964, after President Johnson signed the Civil Right Act.  So many other topics are dealt with, including abuse.  Feminine strength is portrayed sometimes in lovely, other times inspiring, and even in humorous ways.

September 2017

Bill and I really want to walk the Camino de Santiago someday, so we love reading books about other people's experiences as pilgrims.  This one is quite different from the others I've read.  But then again, I'm not sure I could say any of the ones I've read have been enough alike to come up with "typical."

September 2017

This is a novel, not a romance.  It has some pretty significant (and unexpected) drama throughout it.  Great twists in the story.  If you love complex characters, I would highly recommend it.  The writer's style is pretty no-nonsense, which was actually somewhat refreshing.  Great story.  Doesn't necessarily turn out the way you want it to.  (And no, it's not about Sweetwater, Tennessee.  Sweetwater, here, refers to a lodge in the Adirondacks.)

September 2017

A pretty important book for us to read as we prepare to finish building the house we hope to live in for the rest of our lives.  It has really made us think about planning ahead.  Not that we need to build ourselves a home that's fit for 90-year-olds ... but hopefully making it easy enough to retrofit so that we can leave this place feet first and not have to ever grace the halls of a nursing home.  Great discussions and ideas.  It will save a lot of pain, heartache, money, and time in the long run.

September 2017

A sequel to The Guestbook, which I read many months ago.  A sweet romance.  One of the themes is Lupus.  I realized as I was reading this that one of the reasons we ladies love to read romances is because the men actually talk through things!  That's our fantasy.  (To understand what I'm talking about, see this absolutely hilarious, yet profoundly true, video of Mark Gungor: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XjUFYxSxDk&index=2&list=RD814eR5K7KD8)

September 2017

One of my favorite romance authors, Mary Jane Hathaway, kicks off this 6-novella series ... which, by the way, is free on Kindle.  Each novella is written by a different author, but they are set in the same place:  Arcadia Valley, Idaho.  The characters overlap a little ... and I'm guessing that they will overlap more in the 18 books of the series which are to be released one each month.

August 2017

Clean contemporary romance, written by a man (other than Nicholas Sparks)?  I had to check it out.  Very light and fun.  He has a different (in a good way) style.  Sure, I'd recommend it and I'd probably read something else by him.

August 2017

I'm a big-time fan of Joanna Penn.  Her marketing ideas for indie authors are the only ones that make sense for me, and while she does include theory, she is very practical, with specific things to do.  She also has a great website, which can be found at TheCreativePenn.com.

August 2017

This series has kind of grown on me.  The plot is complex enough to be interesting, but the stories are still fairly light.  The writer's style is present tense, which is unusual, and she has a clever sense of humor.  Good exploration of some family and marriage minefields.

August 2017

I don't know if we will ever turn our beekeeping into a business, and if we do, it will probably be mainly Bill's thing, but when I saw this, I thought that it couldn't hurt to read it and maybe I would get some good general input.  I did!!!  This is the first time that I've found really good step-by-step instructions for writing out a business plan -- not just for yourself, but to present to a lender, etc.

August 2017

I'd recommend this book for people who are interested in either checking out beekeeping or are just curious.  It gives a great overview, but certainly not enough to actually do it.  (Note that it's free on Kindle.)  Cute writing style.  If you are grammar Nazi, though, don't get this.  I personally do not have a problem with people writing books who don't get it all right, as long as I am able to figure it out.  I think it's great if someone who is not a natural writer goes to the effort to write a book, and it's wonderful that indie publishing allows us to glean from their expertise.

August 2017

If you've been told, "You're too sensitive," you need to read this book.  Because you know what?  You're not too sensitive; you're just right.  You are the way you are for a reason, and there's a purpose for our kind of sensitivity.  Dr Aron helps us reframe what our culture and individuals have tried to suffocate us with, and encourages us to appreciate the advantages and gift of our sensitivity.

August 2017

Okay, yes, I do see the irony of putting this book right before a book with brownies on it.  (smile)  I'm not a diet type of person, and I avoid diet books.  But Dr John Douillard is someone I really respect.  I'm finding this book interesting, reasonable, and practical.  I'm still reading, and haven't yet tried to apply it.  I would love to hear what someone else thinks of this.

August 2017

This is one of those books I'd enjoy reading even if the plot stank.  The way this woman writes is hilarious.  Puns, understated humor ... But the plot doesn't stink.  It's actually quite good.  Not terribly deep, just pure fun.  Don't read this, though, if you're a conservative who takes herself too seriously.

August 2017

As creatives, we often stubbornly want to figure things out for ourselves ... and we prefer to find a way to do it that no one else has done before.  As I've gotten older, I've learned that this is a waste of creative energy.  There are better places to channel that -- such as writing or painting.  The business part does take some creativity, don't get me wrong.  But much of it can be done perfectly well -- and often more successfully -- by taking the advice and following the lead of someone who has already succeeded.  Joanna Penn is one such person.  Practical as all get out.  You can turn this book into your to-do list.

August 2017
(and several other times in the past year)

Short, but deep ... and hey, it's FREE.  This is an intro to Ted Dekker's newest book, The Forgotten Way, which I'm really looking forward to reading.  If you're ready for a challenge, a change, or if you're wondering if this is all there is to life, I'd recommend this.

July 2017

I love anything Jeff Goins writes, as well as his webinars.  I find him inspiring, practical, and uplifting.  His style is light and fun ... but rich and full of great concepts.  I consider this both business reading and personal growth.  I have highlighted a ton of quotes from this book to put onto 3x5 cards for myself.  Not just quippy motivational stuff.  Meat.  Things to do and work on.  Specifics.  I like that.

June, July, August 2017 - Taking it bit by bit

Okay, so yeah, I'm still reading Queens.  (Read through the book descriptions below for the ongoing saga of my struggle with this tome.)  When I went back to it after finishing Chancey, my Kindle told me that I still have 23 hours and 59 minutes in the book.  Are you freaking kidding me???  So yes, I'm reading about Matilda of Scotland, but when I don't want to fall asleep too quickly, I'm also reading Confessions of a Boss Mom, which feels super special because my Etsy/Facebook friend, Carrie Wood, is featured in it!

July 2017 (Avoidance mode)

Great summer reading.  Fairly light, with enough depth to keep it interesting.  The main character is so different from myself.  You would think that would make it hard to relate, but she's intriguing.  There are some really sweet moments, some frustrations, a little romance.  But most of all, a middle-aged woman finding answers to her struggles through the wisdom of a 7-year-old girl ... and learning that it's really not such a great idea to try to do it all alone.  I liked the way this one ended.

July 2017
Between various Queen Mathildas

Another book I'm reading while I work through Queens.  (Did I mention I tend to read several books at once?  When I lived in Sweetwater, I'd take a stack of books out to the swing each morning and read a little from each.  When I'd go to appointments, I'd take a book bag, not knowing what I'd be in the mood for.  Kindle has made my life so much easier.)  Anyway, Henri Nouwen is one of my very favorite authors.  He's easy to read and very real, but extremely profound.  I really want to let his thoughts sink in, so I might read just one of his books a year ... sometimes over and over.  Another favorite is Life of the Beloved.

July 2017

Not reading this right now, but since I mentioned it above, I thought I should post it here.  This is classic Nouwen.  Beautiful, profound, comforting, joyful.  I first read this at a time when it seemed like everyone around me was trying to convince me I was worthless.  It was like Nouwen sat beside me and was the operating nurse while the Great Physician did surgery on my soul.  I have read this a few times and I imagine I will read it twenty more in my lifetime.  If you need to know that you are The Beloved, lose yourself in his words.

January 2011 ... and a few times since.  (Here because it's mentioned above.)

Light (very light!) reading between Queens (see above - I've read about William the Conqueror's wife, Matilda, and need a break).  I'm enjoying this one.  Fun summer reading.  Writing style is quirky.  And Sweetwater, TN, is mentioned, to my surprise!  If you like Hart of Dixie, you'll love this.  (After finishing:  This actually ended up being much better than I expected.  I was looking for light reading and didn't really have quality in mind.  This novel is well-written and has a great plot!  Not something where you're going to come away with a huge life lesson -- though there is a life lesson if you look for it -- but entertaining and very enjoyable.)  Now ... back to Queens.  I think it's Matilda of Scotland next.  Did you know there were so many Matildas?

July 2017

I'm reading this because Bill enjoyed it and because I'm intrigued by queens.  We've watched a number of movies and TV series on Netflix about monarchs and castles.  We also both read a book about Queen Isabella.  Aside from a few key queens (Bloody Mary, Elizabeths I and II), you really don't hear much about queens, as far as their influence and power in history.  So I thought I'd give this a shot, even though the style Bill usually enjoys is almost painful for me to read. (His taste is more academic; I like stories.)  I can't read more than a few pages of this without falling asleep, but I have to say that it's very interesting.

July 2017 (Reading about one queen at a time and interspersing with something lighter.)

This is one to savor.  I read it in April and am reading it again.  I don't remember the story well ... but what I'm really reading it for is her writing style!  Saturated with lovely imagery, almost poetic, but not.  Scope for the imagination.  (July 10 - Finished this last week and loved it every bit as much the second time.  So beautifully written.)

July 2017

April 2017

Dr Rawls has made a huge difference to my health.  I've struggled with Lyme, which really came to a head in 2015, but which I probably contracted in 2007 (I remember all the horrible symptoms, but I guess it wasn't something they tested for in East Tennessee at the time).  Reading this is kind of an ongoing thing for me.  There is so much to learn from this.  It's easy to read, but so full of info that I will probably need to read it over and over.  You will be surprised at what you learn about Lyme ... and the solutions for it.  Dr Rawls has experienced Lyme himself, which makes him a voice to be reckoned with.  Highly recommend.

July 2017
Ongoing 2017

I'm a James Michener fan.  Edward Rutherfurd writes a lot like Michener:  Sagas that span hundreds or thousands of years, following several families for generations, allowing you to experience history in a less academic way.  This is the story of Salisbury and it's beautifully written.  If you're overwhelmed by 1059 pages, just think of it as several books.  Read about one period at a time, interspersing with something lighter.

June 2017

(and sometime in the 1990s)

Bill and I love anything Sue Hubbell writes.  Her style is casual, down home, and inspirational.  (Scroll down to my March reading for another of her books.)  She uses beautiful imagery, but it's not fluffy.  She writes about day to day life as a beekeeper in the Ozarks, often struggling just to get by.  Sue cuts her own wood, and does many things I would never imagine doing.  She sees beauty in life and I want that to wear off on me.

June 2017

This book has changed my life.  I have always struggled with sleep -- it seems to run in my family.  I read several books about sleep in June and this one had some ideas that I've implemented, which made an immediate difference.  I feel so much better, am more productive, have gotten rid of the fog, and just feel happier and more alive.  (If you want to know exactly what I've done, feel free to ask.)

June 2017

I loved this!  Bill and I are Fixer Upper fans ... it really opened the doors for the house we've bought in the Cherokee National Forest.  Their story is uplifting, inspiring ... and just fun.  We're so bummed that it's no longer on Netflix and would like to watch them again as we fix up our house.  If anyone wants to buy us any of the actual season DVDs from the series, I would send you a copy of any one of my books in return.  (Contact me first, please.)

June 2017

Third time I've read this series.  🙂  Just fun reading!  When nothing else sounds good and I want something that will last a while, I dig this back up.  Fun romances that take place in New Orleans.

June 2017

I don't like drama in my life ... and I don't always like too much of it in books I read, but this one had enough psychological aspects to it, to make it worth the drama.  A group of women who have every reason to hate each other (recent death of husband/lover/father) go on a retreat together to work things out, some unwillingly.

June 2017

I can't remember a time when I wasn't a Michener fan.  I'm not sure when I started reading his books.  Well-researched, I found that they were great to read to my kids when we were studying particular places.  (I admit to censoring from time to time, which is why I read them out loud.)  I had to read Chesapeake while we were still living here on the Eastern Shore, very near where it is set and where Michener lived while writing it.  Highly recommend!

May 2017

I've often said that I would read Elizabeth Gilbert if she wrote 500 pages about taking out the trash.  She's another author to be savored for her style.  The Last American Man is surprising, inspiring, and a fun read.  Very, very different from Eat, Pray, Love or anything else I've read of hers.  You won't be disappointed.

April 2017

Need a good cry?  This one will do it.  Friends and an unexpected way of supporting each other through cancer.

April 2017

As you know, Bill and I keep bees.  We're novices -- just started in April 2016, though Bill helped a friend with a couple hives the previous year and took beekeeping classes.  They are fascinating to watch and we will sit out in our yard a couple feet from the hive, witnessing epic battles as the guards wrestle intruders to the death.  Sue (one of our favorite authors) writes about her beekeeping in the Ozarks.

March 2017

Karen Kingsbury is one of the writers I aspire to be like.  I read her books over and over, wanting to learn from her about style and plot ... and get hopelessly lost in the stories instead.  I can recommend without reservation anything she's written, but this is the most recent I've read.  (2 books here, by the way.)

March 2017

Quite a bit different from the movie. (That's not unusual, right?)  So different, though, that I found I needed to just put the movie out of my mind.  A very enjoyable novel.

March 2017

I love Joanna's books, website, etc about writing, so I just had to check this out.  Very much like Dan Brown's books (DaVinci code).  I can't read too many thrillers because I get nightmares, but if you can, definitely check this out.

February 2017

November 2017

I think this is the third time I've read this book -- maybe just the second.  The story is beautiful, but the spiritual truth (the unmending of the veil) is profound.  You will be deeply challenged ... and remarkably comforted.

February 2017

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